Dog Names and Breeds

General Information about Dogs

The American Foxhound is known to originate from the states of Maryland and Virginia, and is the state dog of Virginia.[1] Though there has long been a rumor that the new breed was originally used for hunting Indigenous peoples of the Americas, this is not true. Its coat is short and generally smooth. It is one of several breeds commonly known as pit bulls.[2][3] In the early part of the twentieth century the breed gained social stature and was accepted by the American Kennel Club as the American Staffordshire Terrier in 1936.[4] The name was changed to reflect difference from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England. For dogs where hairlessness is a dominant gene, hairless to hairless matings will on average produce 66.6% hairless and 33.3% coated puppies. One quality that the American Foxhound is famous for is its musical howl that can be heard for miles. It is a happy breed with average working intelligence, although by being bred to a show standard it is no longer an ideal working dog. Most show hounds are Walkers, many of the pack hounds (used with hunting foxes on horseback) are Penn-Marydel and hunters use a variety of strains to suit their hunting style and quarry.

Interesting facts about Dogs

Some dogs, such as the Löwchen, have an uncertain origin and are listed under several countries. Early training and socialization both in the home and outside of the home is essential for this breed. It is one of several breeds commonly known as pit bulls.[2][3] In the early part of the twentieth century the breed gained social stature and was accepted by the American Kennel Club as the American Staffordshire Terrier in 1936.[4] The name was changed to reflect difference from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England. Today, there are many different strains of American Foxhound, including Walker, Calhoun, Goodman, Trigg, July and Penn-Marydel. Height and weight should be in proportion. It is one of several breeds commonly known as pit bulls.[2][3] In the early part of the twentieth century the breed gained social stature and was accepted by the American Kennel Club as the American Staffordshire Terrier in 1936.[4] The name was changed to reflect difference from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England. Between hairless AHT to coated AHT or Rat Terrier, results are more variable and will produce mixed hairless litters to all coated litters.

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